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What about poor children in America?

Over one billion children – more than half the children in developing countries – suffer from severe deprivation of basic human need and over one third (674 million) suffer from absolute poverty.

While explaining CEED and its mission, I often get asked, “what about the poor children in America?” It’s a fair question. Especially if you haven’t traveled to a third world country and seen firsthand what third world poverty looks like. Here’s the difference, in Africa, child poverty means hunger, disease, illiteracy, abuse, lack of healthcare, and death. The poorest of poor American’s often have access to life’s necessities, clean water, healthcare and education. While traveling in Africa, I was struck one day by a young boy walking down the road. The child looked like you would imagine a kid in Africa would. Tattered clothes, no shoes and probably hadn’t bathed for days. Struck by his sadness, I asked about him later that day. I learned the…

A new lens for understanding what poverty is and the real impact it has on the lives of millions of Children in Africa.

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My first visit to Africa, I witnessed a young boys life being saved. He had an infection in his carotid artery. If he hadn’t had the operation, by the US medical team visiting the area, he would have died. Every day in Africa thousands of kids die needlessly. They die because of poverty. Picture this, a young child comes down with an infection. The illness is something that can be taken care of, almost immediately, in any first world country. But, what if there were no medical facility to take your child to. Alternatively, you did not have the means to help them. It is a reality parents face daily in Africa. Yes, moms cannot give their kids the medical attention they need because they don’t…

Life as a child in Africa

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Contributed by Kathy Sullivan, Executive Director, Operation Dignity International. If you were a child in Ghana this is how you would start your day.  If you were very young, your mother or older sister would put you in a tub and wash you from head to foot – all at one time. If you were a little older like 9 or 10, you would wash yourself, outside, naked. Seem a little strange – no one would care, that’s how all the children do it. You might have porridge for breakfast and if you are really fortunate a big piece of bread to go with it.  Eat well, your next meal will be dinner before you go to bed. When you are 3 years old, you…